Wednesday, December 9, 2015

How Our Characters Look Back At Us

fountain pen pic

One thing I was pondering on recently was my tendency to be so slow with my writing. I reflected on this, and was challenging myself on why I didn't write stories that catered to my natural strengths, (description, character development) in trendy, lucrative contexts. Because I know that I'd be able to do it. If I chose to write some pot boiler full of sex and booze I'd be able to satisfy readers amply. Because it's not hard to do that, when all the reader wants is kicks and I'm perfectly able to be creative with their fantasies. And create a simple story. Picture it, context it, stamp it's done. Pretty much.
  And I realized it's because I want to write stuff that challenges people--and by extension, I want something that would challenge ME. Challenges my world, my life, my thinking. And it's so hard to write about that at times because I am always learning, always reflecting and going back and trying to make sense. It's an ongoing organic state of being that--just in living--makes it hard to get down a story in any timely manner. Because what I want to write about, comes from revelation. And every new day challenges the past one. What I learn today will make me look at my characters anew. And when today always comes again, our characters grow before our eyes, along with ourselves.

  But where to say the end?

  Now that is the question.



  ~ E. C. S. 


"Either write something worth reading or do something worth writing." ~ Benjamin Franklin


 

4 comments:

  1. I think nearly every writer has the problem deciding when to end and when to stop editing because sometimes a book can be edited to death. I know I have that problem.

    Lately, I've been obsessed with character development and I'm constantly asking myself if my future readers would even care to know so much about them or if I'm the only one that wants to know every single detail. That's why I think outside opinions are a great asset that I don't take advantage of often enough.

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  2. Amen.

    Don't write popular fiction. Write deep fiction. Learn from it. Teach through it.

    The ending... will feel right. I recently ended my book a half dozen chapters ahead of where I intended to end it, because it felt right, it ended on a high point, it was just... correct. You'll know.

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  3. You put what I was thinking in words. I recently went through this myself. After some hard thinking, I thought, "You know what, forget the dream of being a bestseller. I'm gonna write true to me and my style." Now I'm working on a short story serial. Will it sell? Maybe. Will it gain a huge following of readers? Probably not. But I am once again writing what I love.

    ReplyDelete
  4. You put what I was thinking in words. I recently went through this myself. After some hard thinking, I thought, "You know what, forget the dream of being a bestseller. I'm gonna write true to me and my style." Now I'm working on a short story serial. Will it sell? Maybe. Will it gain a huge following of readers? Probably not. But I am once again writing what I love.

    ReplyDelete